The art courses are focused on creative expression through National, State, and Local Arts Standards that incorporate intrinsic development, abstract thinking, teamwork, and self-discipline through a structured, supportive educational environment. In addition to making art, students will learn about art through reading and writing, and be subjected to many types of formative assessment.

Exploratory Art (ART 1000) – Elective
Class size limit: 20 — Prerequisite: none — All grades — 1 credit, 1 semester

Exploratory Art is an introduction of art through the study of the art elements and principles. Projects will be an introduction into other art classes offered including: drawing, painting, photography, sculpture with and without clay, and graphic design. Students will learn basic process and techniques working independently, or in small groups to express their creativity. Students enhance knowledge of skills in the design process within the practice of artistic, inquiry-based problem solving.

Drawing (ART 1001) – Elective
Class size limit: 20 — Prerequisite: Exploratory Art — All grades — 1 credit, 1 semester

This course focuses on the fundamentals of drawing from observation and creative thinking. Subject matter may include working from the still life, architectural settings, landscape, and the human figure. Line, shape, perspective, color, and value studies are explored through a variety of drawing media. Students enhance knowledge of and skills in the design process within the practice of artistic, inquiry-based problem-solving.

Painting (ART 1002)- Elective
Class size limit: 20 — Prerequisite: Exploratory Art — All grades — 1 credit, 1 semester

It is strongly recommended students take drawing prior to this course. Development of perceptual two-dimensional skills from a variety of subject matter. Practice with painting materials and techniques with emphasis on tonal and color media. Students continue to enhance knowledge of and skills in the design process within the practice of artistic, inquiry-based problem-solving.

Photography (ART 1103) – Elective
Class size limit: 20 — Prerequisite: Exploratory Art — All grades — 1 credit, 1 semester

This course focuses on the fundamentals of representation using a camera for observation and creative thinking. Subject matter may include portraits, landscapes, common objects, non-objective studies, light painting, architecture, and photojournalism. Computer photo editing and Photoshop will be introduced to enhance photographs. Students enhance knowledge of skills in the design process within the practice of artistic, inquiry-based problem solving.

Independent Art Study (ART 1201) – Elective
Class size limit: 20 — Prerequisite: three years of art and instructor approval — 11th/12th grades — 1/2 credit, 1/2 semester

This in-depth, independent art course refines students as artists. Students will delineate their own website for the course and create projects that will be completed monthly at minimum. Students will work with the teacher and communicate about progress on independently delineated projects. Students may choose to work with a variety of media or focus on one media of interest. Students are required to showcase artwork in and outside of the school (local businesses, AEA offices, etc.).

Sculpture with and without Clay (ART 1102) – Elective
Class size limit: 20 — Prerequisite: Exploratory Art — All grades — 1 credit, 1 semester

Creation of three-dimensional art with a variety of media with an emphasis on form, function, and a combination of the two. Students focus on the creation of form while using color, texture, and other elements and principles of design. Students implement both additive and subtractive forms of sculpture. Students continue to enhance knowledge of and skills in the design process within the practice of artistic, inquiry-based problem-solving.

Graphic Design (ART 1203) – Elective
Class size limit: 20 — Prerequisite: Exploratory Art — All grades — 1 credit, 1 semester

Drawing, computers, and many peripheral devices will be used to create a variety of digital artwork. Projects are two dimensional, three-dimensional, and four-dimensional (length, width, height, and time;/movement) in quality. Design problems in photography, image manipulation, movement (Adobe Flash), movie making, sound manipulation and enhancement, printed graphics and logos, and website design are explored. Students enhance knowledge of and skills in the design process within the practice of artistic, inquiry-based problem-solving.

Business education offers to every individual an opportunity to develop those skills, abilities, and understandings that will enable him or her to handle competently his or her personal business affairs; to develop an understanding of the vocational opportunities available in the broad field of business; and to assume citizenship responsibilities through an understanding and appreciation of the American enterprise system.

Introduction to Business (BUS 0901/0902) – Elective
Prerequisite: None — All grades — 2 credits, 2 semesters

Introduction to Business is a basic business course explaining the role of business in our economic system. Since this is the first business course for most students, the course content will look at our free enterprise system through three roles a student will play: a worker; a consumer; and a citizen. The course will provide a solid basis for those students considering further study in business, as well as offering useful and practical aspects of living to students not intending further business studies. Several simulations will be used to provide hands-on experience with the business concepts studied.

Personal Finance (BUS 1101) – Elective
Prerequisite: None — 11th and 12th grades — 1 credit, 1 semester

Personal Finance is a basic business class designed to provide students with a set of basic financial skills and tools that can be effectively applied throughout their lives as personal money managers. Students are given the opportunity to learn the basics of financial planning and apply that process through relevant activities. In addition, students are instructed in the effective use of all financial resources.

The following units will be covered:

  1. Introduction to Personal Finance
  2. Saving and Investing
  3. Budgeting and Credit
  4. Consumer Awareness
  5. Insurance, Taxes, and Giving

Accounting I (BUS 1102/1103) – Elective
Prerequisite: None — 11th and 12th grades — 2 credits, 2 semesters

Accounting I will give the student a thorough background in the basic accounting procedures used to operate a business organized as a sole proprietorship, partnership, or a corporation. The accounting procedures presented will also serve as a sound background for employment in office jobs and preparation for studying business courses in college.

The second semester will expand on the students’ understanding of manual accounting procedures by accessing automated accounting procedures. Students successfully completing the required competencies in Accounting I may seek advanced standing in:

  1. Any of Iowa’s Community College Business/Office Education programs requiring Accounting/Bookkeeping Fundamentals.
  2. American Institute of Business (AIB) programs requiring Introduction to Accounting.

Students interested in seeking advanced standing status should visit with the instructor BEFORE enrolling.

Intro to Entrepreneurship (BUS 1201) – Elective
Prerequisite: See Counselor (NIACC course – 3 sh) — 11th and 12th grades — 1 credit, 1 semester

This course introduces the concept of Entrepreneurship beginning with identifying characteristics of the entrepreneur, evaluating opportunities, feasibility, financing and planning for success. Students will also understand the need for a contingency plan as well as an exit strategy.

Computer Applications I (BUS 0903) – Elective
Prerequisite: Student must be able to type at least 20 wpm — All grades — 1 credit, 1 semester

This practical course offers both an introduction to computer applications and a study of computer use in modern society. It focuses on the computer as a machine which students will use in almost any career field. This course is designed to instruct the student on how to operate a microcomputer through hands-on experience and to promote basic computer literacy. Students will receive instruction on how to use word processing, data base management, and electronic spreadsheet software. This course DOES NOT teach computer programming.

Computer Applications II (BUS 0904) – Elective
Prerequisite: Must complete Computer Applications I with minimum grade of “C” — All grades — 1 credit, 1 semester

Computer Applications II is designed to provide advanced instruction in the individual applications– spreadsheet, database, word processing, and graphing–through a problem-oriented approach. Strong emphasis will be placed on the integration of these individual computer applications in both personal and business decision-making situations.

Students successfully completing Computer Applications I and II may be eligible for community college credit. Students interested in seeking college credit for these courses should visit with the instructor BEFORE enrolling.

Human Relations (BUS 1202) – Elective
Prerequisite: See Counselor (NIACC course – 3 sh) — 11th and 12th grades — 1 credit, 1 semester

Designed to provide students with skills for success on the job and the tools for obtaining and maintaining employment. Will teach students how to communicate in a professional manner, maturely deal with conflict, behave in a fair and ethical manner, be accountable to team members and develop leadership skills. Appropriate use of technology, suitable workplace attire, proper business etiquette and self-management techniques.

The Family and Consumer Science program is designed to provide knowledge and skills in all areas of living: foods; nutrition; clothing selection, care and construction; child care and development; housing selection, decorating and care: relationships involved in personal and family living, consumer skills, and resource management.

Independent Living I (FCS 0901) – Elective
Class size limit: 20 — Grades 9, 10 — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

This course will begin to prepare the student to live on his/her own after high school and successfully accomplish life’s everyday challenges. The student explores career possibilities and workplace readiness skills are introduced. The student fills out job applications, prepares for a job interview and learns to conduct him/herself appropriately in the world of work. Money management skills are developed by learning about saving for the future, using credit wisely, budgeting, balancing a checkbook and electronic banking. A unit on basic clothing care, which includes pressing a shirt and a pair of pants, is covered. The student will become a responsible consumer as he/she learns about grocery shopping and reads nutritional labels. Basic cooking skills are learned as the student learns to use the kitchen appliances.

Life Management (FCS 0903) – Elective
Class size limit: 20 — Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

This course is designed to prepare the student for the many changes he/she will experience in the near future. Employability skills are sharpened as the student learns to compose a resume, write a cover letter, interview for a job, and learn the importance of soft skills in the workplace. Financial literacy skills are addressed by focusing on the credit score, the credit report and using credit wisely. Electronic banking, budgeting and balancing a checkbook is reviewed. The student will evaluate housing options, read apartment leases, review basic essentials for furnishing an apartment, and discuss the ups and downs of living with roommates. Students become healthy consumers by practicing grocery shopping techniques and survival cooking skills. Insurance concepts are covered, as time permits.

Foods and Nutrition (FCS 1001) – Elective
Class size limit: 16 — All grades — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

Students are introduced to culinary skills and techniques as they learn about nutrition, food safety and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. They learn how to set a table and practice good manners while eating. Students work in groups as they plan, prepare, serve and evaluate foods. Food preparation units include fruits and vegetables, grains, dairy products, eggs, fats and oils and knife skills.

Advanced Foods (FCS 1101) – Elective
Class size limit: 16 — All grades — Prerequisite: Foods and Nutrition — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

Students continue to perfect their culinary skills as they prepare foods from around the world. Units on vegetarian cuisine, beef, pork and poultry are explored. Decorating cakes and cupcakes is also covered. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is reviewed as the students learn ways to reduce fat and calories from their food choices. Meal planning and preparation for guests, including catering opportunities, are experienced.

Housing and Interior Design (FCS 1102) – Elective
Class size limit: 20 — All grades — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

This course prepares the student for his/her future role of purchasing and decorating a home. Areas of study include: Architectural design from colonial to modern times, the exterior and interior construction of a house, and the home buying process. The students will learn about decorating the interior using the elements and principles of design to select colors, furniture, carpet and lighting. Field trips will be taken, as time permits.

Child Development (FCS 0902) – Elective
Class size limit: 24 — All grades — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

Children demand and deserve love, attention and proper care, and this class will give students the basic knowledge they need to understand the growing needs and development of children. The subjects of conception, prenatal development, birth, infancy, the toddler and the preschooler are covered. Routine care, nutritional needs, health and safety issues, discipline, financial responsibility, child abuse and teen parenthood are studied.

Style and Fashion (FCS 1202) – Elective
Class size limit: 18 — All grades — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

Clothing plays an important role in a person’s self-esteem. Students will study the history of fashion, fashion trends, the impact of color and the various body shapes in order to evaluate what styles look right for them. Fibers, fabrics and clothing care will also be studied. Students will become reacquainted with the sewing machine as they construct a simple garment from a pattern. If time permits, a second item of choice will be constructed.

The study of foreign languages gives an insight into many of the world’s great cultures. A foreign language requirement now exists at all major universities in the state and around the country. French and Spanish are romance languages based on Latin. Both are sophisticated and fascinating languages. French is considered the universal language – the language of diplomacy. Spanish is the important language of all the Americas. One-tenth of the population of the U.S. has Spanish roots. That means there are a lot of Spanish speaking people in the United States. It is already the majority language in California, and is approaching that level in many southern and southwestern states.

Spanish I (FL 0901/0902) – Elective
Grades 9, 10 — Prerequisite: Must have a “C” or better in the previous year’s English class and score above the 40%ile on the ITBS English Test — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

Basic grammar, idioms and vocabulary essential for a practical command of Spanish is studied in this course. Emphasis is on correct pronunciation, ability to use and understand the spoken word, general reading knowledge and composition. Emphasis is on contemporary culture and conversation.

Spanish II (FL 1001/1002) – Elective
Grades 10, 11 — Prerequisite: Spanish I — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

Continued emphasis is on oral communication and grammar. Idioms and vocabulary give students a practical reading and speaking knowledge of Spanish. Drill in conversation and composition is also included.

Spanish III (FL 1101/1102) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Spanish II — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

The goals of this course are to promote greater fluency and facility in reading, writing, listening and understanding. Some possible areas to be included are: Mexican history, Spanish history, art, dances, foods, geography and current events.

Spanish IV (FL 1201/1202) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Spanish III — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

This course is a continuation of Spanish III with a further emphasis on oral proficiency.

French I (FL 0903/0904) – Elective
Grades 9, 10 — Prerequisite: Must have a “C” or better in the previous year’s English class and score above the 40%ile on the ITBS English Test — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

Students will learn basic vocabulary and grammar structures, including greeting each other, describing people, likes and dislikes, making/accepting/refusing suggestions, making excuses, and asking simple questions. Students will build a foundation for communicating in French and an understanding of various French customs and culture that will including listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.

French II (FL 1003/1004) – Elective
Grades 10, 11 – Prerequisite: French I – 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

Emphasis is on oral communication and grammar. Idioms and vocabulary give the student a practical reading knowledge of the language. Drill is used for conversation and composition.

French III (FL 1103/1104) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: French II — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

The emphasis in this course is on conversational ability. Some possible areas to be included are: food, health, tourism and French literature.

French IV (FL 1203/1204) – Elective
Grade 11, 12 — Prerequisite: French III — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

This course is a continuation of French III with a further emphasis on oral proficiency.

Community Health (HLTH 0902) – Required
Grade 9 — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

Health is an activity-centered course designed to help the student develop an awareness of physical and mental needs, the effects of alcohol, tobacco, drugs, and poisons on the human body, the characteristics of communicable and non communicable diseases and current crucial health issues, human sexuality, self-esteem, stress management and interpersonal relationships. The subject will help students, through heightened awareness, set personal health goals and accept responsibility for personal health and wellness.

Industrial Technology provides a means by which the student can apply in practical and meaningful situations, the theoretical principles of science, mathematics, social science, and related subjects. Industrial technology is that portion of general education devoted to understanding and solving the technical and human problems brought about by the industrialization and technological advancement of our society. It is especially concerned with introducing students to the nation’s industries through courses in drafting, wood, metal, power, and electronics. Students considering careers in engineering, industry, or construction on any level will find the courses helpful.

Mechanical Drafting (IND 0903) – Elective
Grades 9, 10 — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

Course content will include: freehand sketching, use of drawing instruments, lettering, geometric constructions, multi-view drawings, blue print reading, dimensioning and CAD. Using this content the students will work in a project-based atmosphere developing a project that can be created within the course and lead into Maintenance Shop Operations. Mechanical Drafting is a prerequisite for Architectural Drafting. Together they are a year of course work.

Architectural Drafting (IND 0902) – Elective – Articulated NIACC Course
Grades 9, 10 — Prerequisite: Mechanical Drafting — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

Students will learn about the fundamentals of drawing using manual and computer-aided drafting skills. Architectural Drafting is designed to give students the skills necessary to produce a set of working drawings. Students will learn to draw plans, sections, elevations, details and schedules.

Maintenance Shop Operations (IND 0901) – Elective
Grades 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Mechanical/Architectural Drafting — 1 Credit, 1 Semester — See Counselor (NIACC course – 3 sh)

This course is a prerequisite for Transportation Fundamentals. Projects that have been developed in Mechanical Drafting will incorporate aspects of MSO. The student is introduced to shop equipment generally found in the industrial maintenance environment. The student uses safe setup and produces parts with metal saws, drills and grinders. They will work with basic welding and cutting, thread repair, anchors and fasteners. Student use of mechanical prints to identify parts in assembly and repair situations is practiced, along with the use of catalogs to find and order repair parts, study bearings and seals and failure analysis.

Transportation Fundamentals (AUT 1406) – Elective
Grades 10, 11, 12 – Prerequisite: Mechanical/Architectural Drafting and MSO – 1 Credit, 1 Semester

This course will require many of the basic elements required to be successful in transportation courses. The concepts covered include basic electronics and an introduction to basic shop equipment. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving, proper use and application of equipment, study of electrical and mechanical diagrams, and ability to identify equipment needed in repair situations. Coursework will include many hands- on exercises with industrial grade equipment.

Building Trades (IND 0904) – Elective
Grades 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Mechanical/Architectural Drafting Suggested — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

This course is a continuation of Architectural Drafting. Projects that are developed in Architectural Drafting will be created in Building Trades course. Using project-based learning students will gain knowledge of the building process. Students will be exposed to floor systems, wall systems, roof systems, green building techniques, advanced framing techniques and finishing processes.

Automotive I & II (IND 0905/0906)Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: MSO & Transportation Fundamentals — 2 Credits, 1 Semester (2 periods ea)

Students will be introduced to the automotive industry. Students will learn skills in auto mechanics. Curriculum will include safety in the shop, care and use of tools, engine construction, ignition systems, fuel systems, charging systems, starting systems, electronic systems, brake systems, lubrication and tune up. Students will also gain knowledge in engine rebuilding, transmissions, clutch, drivetrain, differentials, suspension systems and electrical systems.

English is the foundation through which thousands of other areas have been opened. We depend on it constantly. No matter what one does with his/her life, or what one achieves within oneself, he/she will use English in all areas of daily life.

English I (LA 0901/0902) – Required
Grade 9 — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

English I serves as the foundation for the years to come. It introduces many pictures of life through a variety of viewpoints. The focus is on bringing the past and the present together through numerous devices such as small-group discussion, films, reports, independent study, and more. It includes all varieties of literature, as well as the techniques for correct usage of grammar and the composition of themes. It’s an exploration course.

English II (LA 1001/1002) – Required
Grade 10 — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

Students will explore the skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening, and viewing. Students will review the parts of speech, sentences, and grammatical usage. The course will concentrate on the descriptive, narrative and expository writing skills. Students will also be given an overview of literary skills while examining the short story, drama and novel.

World Studies LA (LA 1003/1004) – Elective
Grade 10 — Prerequisite: English I – grade of “B” or above and teacher recommendation — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

Any student taking this course must take BOTH World Studies LA and World Studies SS simultaneously. The course work cannot be divided. World Studies is a two-semester course that combines the study of world history, world literature and advanced composition. Designed for the advanced student, the course concentrates on seeing relationships between literature and history and drawing conclusions from them to apply to the present. The reading will concentrate on primary and secondary sources, short stories, essays, speeches, poetry, and novels. Students will also write a variety of essays and a research paper. All instruction supports the Iowa Core Standards.

English III – #LA 1101/1102 Required Grade 11

2 Credits 2 Semesters

English III is a two-semester course in the language arts program designed primarily for juniors. In the class, students will be exposed to American Literature and Basic Composition skills. The course concentrates on American literature from the Puritan Era to the Twentieth Century. The American literary heritage will be examined in close relation to the history of the country in a chronological format. Composition instruction will provide practice in the fundamentals of written expression. Construction of sound sentences and coherent paragraphs will be emphasized with the combining of these into composition form as the ultimate goal.

American Heritage LA – #LA 1103/1104 Elective Grade 11

Prerequisite: English II and World History – 2 Credits 2 semesters

grade of “B” or above in both (Will be taken in place of English III)

courses or teacher recommendation.

American Heritage is a two-semester course that combines the study of American literature, American history and advanced composition. Designed for the advanced student, the course concentrates on seeing relationships between literature and history and drawing conclusions from them to apply to the present. Reading will concentrate on the history text, short stories, essays, speeches, poetry, and novels. Some literature will be introduced through the film medium. Students will also write a variety of essays and a research paper in the course. Any student taking this course must take BOTH American Heritage LA and American Heritage SS simultaneously. The course work cannot be divided.

Creative Writing – #LA 1202 Elective Grades 11, 12

Prerequisite: English II 1 Credit 1 Semester

Students will use the writing process to construct, edit and publish a variety of creative writing genres.

COURSE OUTCOMES:

  • Build a better understanding of self-reflection as a means to writing creatively.
  • Develop skills necessary to create various forms of creative writing.
  • Explore various techniques and exercises used in writing creatively.
  • Develop an understanding of creative writing as a means of self-expression.
  • Create a portfolio of personal work for possible publication.
  • Create a final project by expanding on an item from portfolio collection.
  • Investigate writing and its importance to a community.

Senior Composition – #LA 1201 Elective Grade 12

Prerequisite: English III or American Heritage L.A. 1 Credit 1 Semester

This one-semester course gives the senior student an opportunity to develop the writing skills and techniques required for college or vocational schools after high school. Concentration will be on writing the essay, on using a standard style book, and on developing a mature style in terms of organization, diction, form, style, phraseology and content.

Speech I – #LA 1005 or LA 1006 Required Grades 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None 1 Credit 1 Semester

Each student is required to take one semester of Speech sometime during high school. This course is a introduction to group and individual communication. Students learn general communications concepts and skills and have an opportunity to learn and practice group communication skills and public speaking. The course is designed to improve daily communication skills.

Leadership & Character – #LA 1207 Elective Grade 12

Prerequisite: None 1 Credit 1 Semester

Leadership and Character is a nation-wide curriculum designed to make American students better leaders and to develop understanding and utilization of mature character traits. Students will engage in activities ranging from kinesthetic, to viewing, to reading non-fiction and to discussing models of what it means to live a healthier, more meaningful lifestyle; in the course of which, they will begin to amend their thinking and make better decisions for themselves, their families, and their communities.

Independent Literature – #LA 1105 Elective Grades 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: 1 Credit 1 Semester

This elective course is designed to augment skills in both reading and writing in response to literature and non-fiction. A contract grading system gives students the opportunity to practice their literacy skills as they are coached to make appropriate choices in length, variety of genres, and difficulty of readings. The quality of both oral and written responses structured around the six traits of reading and writing is also a major contract component. Critical thinking and self-assessment will be both taught and expected.

COURSE OUTCOMES:

  • Develop critical thinking and self-assessment skills for the 21st Century.
  • Expand thinking over a variety of literary genres.
  • Apply literary terminology to reading and writing.
  • Analyze the text defending personal viewpoints in both oral and written conferences.
  • Improve cultural literacy by reading a wide variety of literature and non-fiction by both American and global authors.
  • Track reading choices and reflect on them as a whole.

ESL (English as a Second Language) – #016 Elective Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Must meet Dept. of Ed. guidelines 2 Credits 2 Semesters as a non-English speaking student

This program is designed to aid those students whose native language is not English. The major objectives

of the course are:

1. To improve basic English skills focusing on such areas as:

a. parts of speech

b. spelling

c. vocabulary

d. reading comprehension

e. sentence structure

2. To improve study skills by assisting each student in their regular academic classes. Primarily, this

support is in the form of tutoring with emphasis placed on student responsibility for learning material.

With the belief that mathematics is of universal importance and that students should be provided the opportunity to improve their level of mathematical competence, we feel the following courses will prepare students for success in college, in careers, and in daily life in the 21st century. The goals of the math department are to help students develop the ability to: explore and solve mathematical problems, think critically, work cooperatively with others, and communicate ideas clearly.

(Note: A calculator is required for all math classes. A scientific calculator is sufficient for all courses except Algebra II, Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus, and Calculus. Those courses require a graphing calculator.)

General Math I (MA 0901/0902) – Elective
Grade 9 — Prerequisite: Instructor approval — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

This freshman course is designed to improve the skills in addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of numbers and to show how to apply these skills to daily living.

General Math II (MA 0903/0904) – Elective
Grades 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: General Math I or instructor approval — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

This course expands on the topics covered in General Math I. It also includes consumer related topics.

Consumer Math I (MA 0905) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

This course places emphasis on mathematics needed in consumer and career situations with review of basic computational skills. Some of the topics will be fractions, percents, income, and personal banking. Recommended for juniors and seniors.

Consumer Math II (MA 0906) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit 1 Semester

This course places emphasis on mathematics needed in consumer and career situations with review of basic computational skills. Some of the topics will be housing, budgeting, taxes, insurance, buying a car, automobile operating expenses, and investments. Recommended for juniors and seniors.

Pre-Algebra (MA 1001/1002) – Elective
Grades 9, 10 — Prerequisite: General Math I or recommendation — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

This course is designed to prepare students for Algebra I. Topics include: algebraic expressions and integers, solving equations and inequalities, factors, fractions, exponents, decimals, ratios, proportions and percent, area and volume, linear functions and graphing, right triangles, probability, and polynomials.

Algebra I (MA 1003/1004) – Elective
Grade 9, 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra or recommendation — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

This first year Algebra course includes the following topics: solving equations and inequalities, solving and applying proportions, functions, linear equations and their graphs, systems of linear equations and inequalities, exponents and exponential functions, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations and radical expressions.

Geometry (MA 1101/1102) – Elective
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Algebra I — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

This course covers a variety of geometry topics including: reasoning and proofs, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, area, surface area and volume, circles, and transformations. Algebra skills are needed.

Algebra II (MA 1103/1104) – Elective
Grades 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Geometry or instructor approval — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

This second year Algebra course reinforces many of the key concepts learned in Algebra I, but with emphasis in the following areas: solving equations and inequalities, understanding functions and functional notation, solving systems, working with quadratic functions and polynomials of a higher degree, solving radical and rational equations, simplifying expressions (including radical and rational expressions).

Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus (MA 1201 /1202) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Algebra II — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

This Pre-Calculus course reinforces many of the key concepts expected of all students exposed to the Iowa Core. In addition it develops a number of skills needed to be successful in the study of Calculus. These addition skills (topics) include a thorough understanding of rational functions, logarithmic functions and exponential functions, as well as a solid understanding of the trigonometric functions. Right triangle trigonometry, graphs of trigonometric functions, the unit circle, Law of Sines and Law of Cosines are topics included within the study of the trigonometric functions. Trigonometric identities are heavily emphasized, as well as a brief introduction to the idea of a limit.

Calculus (MA 1203/1204) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

Key concepts covered in Calculus include the following:

  1. Prerequisites. Students can solve a variety of equations including linear and quadratic equations. Students can solve inequalities. In addition, students can graph equations and provide graphical representations of data. Students can solve systems of equations.
  2. Functions and their graphs. Students can recognize, analyze and graph functions including trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. Students understand and can use transformations which shift, reflect and stretch graphs. Students can find inverse functions when appropriate.
  3. Polynomials and rational functions. Students can solve polynomial functions of higher degree. Students can work with and perform operations on complex numbers. Students can perform both polynomial and synthetic division. Students understand when vertical asymptotes are in existence.
  4. Limits and their properties. Students can find limits both graphically and numerically. Students can evaluate limits analytically. Students understand the concepts of continuity, one-sided limits, and infinite limits.
  5. Differentiation. Students can use basic differentiation rules including power rule, product rule, quotient rule and chain rule. Students can differentiate a variety of functions including but not limited to polynomials, root functions, rational functions, algebraic functions, trigonometric functions, exponential functions and logarithmic functions. Students can also perform higher order derivatives and implicit differentiation.
  6. Applications of differentiation. Students can find extrema on an interval. Students use first derivative test to find intervals of increase and decrease. Students use second derivative test to find intervals of concavity. Students can apply differentiation as an aid to curve sketching. Students use differentiation to solve optimization problems.
  7. Integration. Students understand the concept of anti-derivatives and indefinite integration. Students can use the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to find definite integrals.
The study of music is designed to develop at least four areas of students’ lives through involvement in, and preparation for, musical performances: 1) Enjoyment of the musical art — working together toward a common goal; 2) Appreciation of musical elements — involving historical periods, composers, forms, and styles; 3) Self-expression — communication through music’s varied emotions, images and ideas; 4) Technical skill development — gradual, but consistent improvement, whether vocal or instrumental. Every student enrolled in a musical performing group is required to attend a small group (or solo) lesson once per six-day cycle. Students should also expect elements of music theory to be included in the courses. Stressed also will be reading skills — that is, interpreting the musical symbols on the page.

Concert Band (MUS 0901/0902) – Elective
Grades 9, 10 11, 12 — Prerequisite: 1 year of previous experience in instrumental music is desirable — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

  • The Concert Band is composed of all high school instrumentalists. Participation is required for ALL performances.
  • All students are required to take band lessons. Students will be scheduled for one lesson per 6 day cycle. One “freebie” is allowed per quarter.
  • Concert Band members are also members of the marching band and pep band. Students may audition for Jazz Band.
  • A Band Calendar of Events will be made available in August each year. The calendar will stand as the curriculum for the school year.
  • Marching Band: Formed during the fall and spring for all band members.
  • Pep Band: Currently those enrolled in Concert Band are assigned to one of two pep bands. Each band is assigned 4-5 events to perform at each year.
  • Jazz Band: Play a variety of jazz, rock, and pop music, meets before school and some evenings.
  • Solo/Ensembles: Any and all members are encouraged to study and perform in small group performances at various functions and state solo/ensemble contests.

Concert Choir (MUS 0905/0906) – Elective
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: None — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

Concert Choir is open to students in grades 9-12 who enjoy singing. Music from a variety of styles and time periods is studied within the framework of serious rehearsal and performance. Individual or small group lessons are included once per cycle. Concert Choir will represent CLHS in the State Large Group Festival, and participation in the State Solo/Ensemble Festival is encouraged, as schedules permit.

Chamber Singers (MUS 1001/1002) — Elective
Grades 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Previous experience in Concert Choir is desirable, but not required– 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

Chamber Singers is a select ensemble for men and women in grades 10-12. Like Concert Choir, music from a variety of styles and time periods is studied within the framework of serious rehearsal and performance. Individual or small group lessons are included once per cycle. All-State Auditions, the Fall Musical, and the State Solo/Ensemble Festival are all expectations of those in Chamber Singers.

In addition to the course offerings Concert Choir and Chamber Singers, extra-curricular activities offered in the Vocal Music Department include Opus Honor Choir Auditions (9th grade), Honor Choir Festivals, Fall Musical, Mane Event, and State Solo/Ensemble Festival.

Physical Education (4 semesters required) – Required
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

The physical education program is basically designed to provide opportunities for the student to experience and participate in a variety of activities. The emphasis is on activities which provide a carry-over value outside of school include: constructive use of leisure time, providing recreational value, physical awareness and fitness, and resourcefulness outside of class situations.

Individual and team activities: basketball, softball, volleyball, soccer, speedball, flag football, archery, badminton, golf, bowling, tennis and other recreational games, handball, tumbling, dancing, physical fitness, canoeing, racquetball, weight lifting, fishing, table tennis, throw-ton, pickleball, and yoga.

Appreciation Courses: wrestling, self-defense, downhill skiing, trapshooting, hunter safety, and rock climbing.

Strength & Aerobic Training (PE 0902/0903) — Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 2 Semesters

An early-bird fitness class will be offered from 6:30-7:20 a.m. Classes will meet daily for 1 quarter per semester. The curriculum will emphasize activities designed for a healthy life style (strength training and aerobic exercise). Seniors will be given preferred placement in the class, with juniors having the opportunity to register if the class is not full. Physical Education credit will be given.

Students at Clear Lake High School have the opportunity to earn college credit during their high school careers. Students must make an appointment with a counselor to register for these courses. The options are as follows:

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY HUBS & CAREER PROGRAMS

  • Automotive Service Technology
  • Construction Technology
  • Climate Control Technology
  • Electromechanical Systems Technology
  • Tool & Die Technology
  • Welding

HEALTH COURSE

The health class offered at Clear Lake High School is an entry level course which may be applied to a variety of health careers including the Certified Nurses Aid Program.

Medical Terminology I (HSC 1401) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: See Counselor — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

Introduction of basic medical terminology utilizing a programmed, word-building system to learn word parts to construct and analyze new terms. Emphasis is placed on spelling, definition, usage and pronunciation. It is suggested students purchase a medical dictionary. This course usually transfers as a technical elective and is a required course for several health care programs; an excellent foundation course for students pursuing medical, health care, law degrees.

PSYCHOLOGY COURSES

Introduction to Psychology (PSY 1401) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: See Counselor — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

An introduction to the scientific study of behavior; a brief history of psychology as a science, and topics fundamental to human behavior including developmental issues, sensory abilities, cognitive performance, social and emotional factors in behavior, and abnormal behavior and therapies.

Developmental Psychology (PSY 1403) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: See Counselor — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

A topical approach to studying the physical, cognitive, social and emotional domains of human development from conception to death. A variety of psychological well-being and life satisfaction across the lifespan are discussed. Examining the research in these areas allows students to understand and appreciate different perspectives on cultural, ethnic, and gender issues.

POST-SECONDARY ENROLLMENT OPTION

PSEO (Post-Secondary Courses) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: See Counselor — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

This option was implemented by the State Legislature several years ago. The purpose of this legislative act is to promote rigorous academic or vocational/technical standards by allowing students to enroll part-time in college courses. Students must take high school classes along with college classes.

Post-secondary enrollment option courses are located on the college campus. The student and his/her Counselor will adjust the student’s high school schedule to provide time to attend the college course(s). College courses can also be taken in the evening.

This option is open to any 11th or 12th grade student, or to 9th and 10th grade students identified as talented and gifted. Students may not enroll in courses that are “comparable” to high school course offerings. A student may be required to complete a high school pre-requisite prior to enrolling in a college course(s).

PSEO classes will be recorded in the student’s transcript and will be calculated in the student’s high school grade point average.

Payment for these classes will be worked out between the student, Clear Lake High School, and the post-secondary institution. Students must notify the Guidance Office of the intent to enroll in a PSEO course during registration for classes in February of the previous year.

The science department is an integral part of the curriculum of Clear Lake High School. It includes basic courses designed to meet the needs of a wide range of ability levels of high school students. The many students who will pursue science courses no further than high school will receive a wealth of functional knowledge of science needed in their everyday life activities. This knowledge is essential to the students who will continue their scientific study in the advanced courses in high school or at the college and university level.

Physical Science (SCI 0901/0902) – Required
Grade 9 — Prerequisite: None — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

Physical Science provides coverage of chemical and physical concepts. Physical Science emphasizes thinking skills, an appreciation of technology, an awareness of the interrelationships among the various scientific fields, and the practical application of scientific principles.

Biology (SCI 1001/1002) – Required
Grade 10 — Prerequisite: None — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

Biology is not only designed to prepare the college bound student for more advanced biology courses, but also to acquaint all students with scientific methods and attitudes, to make the student think objectively, to make students more aware of their natural environment, to improve our general health standards, to acquaint the student with some of the outstanding biologists, to improve our daily life, to introduce the student to various biological occupations, and to enable the student to attain an understanding of the biological principles.

Units of work in this course include botany, cytology, zoology, human anatomy, physiology, genetics, microbiology, conservation, ecology, evolution and taxonomy.

Chemistry I (SCI 1101/1102) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: 2 years of college-bound math (Algebra I & Geometry) with a “C” or better average both semesters — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

This is a college-preparatory course which is laboratory centered. Good math skills are necessary and each student should have a scientific calculator for their personal use. A clear and valid picture of the steps by which scientists proceed is carefully presented and repeatedly used.

Chemistry is the study of matter, its structure, properties and composition, and the changes that matter undergoes. Topics that will be covered include measurement and problem solving, matter and energy, atomic structure, chemical equations, phases of matter, gas laws, chemical bonding, solutions, kinetics and thermodynamics, acids/bases and pH, oxidation/reduction and electrochemistry.

Chemistry II (SCI 1204) – Elective
Grade 12 — Prerequisite: Chemistry I and teacher recommendation — 1 Credit 1 Semester

This is a college-preparatory course for students who plan on taking chemistry as part of their course work in college. The course will try to mirror the content and difficulty of an introductory college chemistry course. The course will be heavily text centered but will still use the laboratory to reinforce and analyze key concepts.

Physics (SCI 1201/1202) – Elective
Grade 12 — Prerequisite: Algebra II or Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

A knowledge of the fundamental laws of our physical world is a primary objective of the course. The historical and philosophical significance and evolution of physics and the role of curiosity, experimentation, generalization, formulation of principles, and applications are discussed in the course of study. Subject matter includes such topics as matter and energy, force, force and motion, heat, wave motion, sound, and light,. A strong mathematical background is highly recommended for a student planning to enroll in this course.

Environmental Science I & II (SCI 1205/1206) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Physical Science and Biology — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

Environmental Science will cover topics including: environmental, earth, space and physical science. Coursework will seek to show the interrelationships between these sciences. This course is an alternative for the third year requirement in science for students who do not wish to take Chemistry, Physics, or Anatomy/Physiology

Anatomy & Physiology (SCI 1103/1104) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Must have a “C” or better in Biology. Chemistry is also recommended, but not required — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

This subject is designed to familiarize students with the structures and functions of the human body and to prepare those who are interested for further specialized work in the field. The former will be held as the chief objective of the course because it is believed that the more advanced and technical courses will give the especially interested students their required professional knowledge.

Anatomy II (SCI 1203) – Elective
Grade 12 — Prerequisite: Anatomy & Physiology — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

Anatomy and Physiology II is a continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Students will study the human body systems not already covered in Anatomy and Physiology I. This course also includes projects such as the organization of the annual school blood drive. It is only offered second semester.

The social sciences are a way of creating contributing members for a democratic society. Our purpose is to develop critical and analytical thinkers in order to understand the present through a study of the past. We would hope that these course offerings would serve to encourage future individual study on the part of the student.

World History (SS 1001/1002) – Required
Grade 10 — Prerequisite: None — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

World History is a required two semester course which makes use of both traditional texts and outside research materials. This course begins with the development of early cavepersons and travels to current civilizations always relating past to present. The first nine weeks will focus on the activities of early cultures and the development of law through the Middle Ages. The second nine weeks will explore the impact of the Renaissance and Reformation, as well as the changes brought about by exploration of the New World and the advent of the Age of Reason. The third nine weeks will study the importance of the English, French and Industrial Revolutions. The final nine weeks will introduce the students to the challenges of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries including imperialism, nationalism, totalitarianism and the emergence of the free world as a super power. The overall objective of this course is to help the student develop an understanding of the nation’s activities as well as a view of the whole world while becoming a responsible citizen and student of history.

World Studies SS (SS 1003/1004) – Elective
Grade 10 — Prerequisite: Cultural World Geography with grade of “B”or above and teacher recommendation (Will be taken in place of World History) — 2 Credits, 2 semesters

Any student taking this course must take BOTH World Studies SS and World Studies LA simultaneously. The course work cannot be divided.

World Studies is a two semester course that combines the study of world history, world literature, and advanced composition. Designed for the advanced student, the class will concentrate on seeing relationships between literature and history and drawing conclusions from them to apply to the present world. The course will cover Pre-history to World War II, making connections through history and its impact on the world we live in today. The reading will concentrate on primary and secondary sources, short stories, essays, speeches, poetry, and novels while reinforcing reading strategies and vocabulary development. Students will also write a variety of essays and a research paper which will reinforce and expand upon the language skills taught in English I. All instruction will support the Iowa Core standards that are currently being taught in the separate courses.

American History (SS 1101/1102) – Required
Grade 11 — Prerequisite: None — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

American History is a required course based on a chronological approach to which we introduce different themes throughout the history of the United States, covering the age of Jackson through contemporary times. It is felt, upon the completion of the course, the students will have gained a basic understanding of our present day problems and why we have them, and also they will have explored numerous possible solutions in an attempt to find an answer to these problems. It is hoped that the students will be able to learn to express themselves much more adequately, in both a written and an oral way. The students should become more knowledgeable about their country and will, therefore, be a more patriotic citizen. Certainly, it is also hoped that we would whet the appetite of the person in order to go on to further individual reading and pursuance of the social sciences.

American Heritage SS (SS 1103/1104) – Elective
Grade 11 — Prerequisite: English II and World History grade of “B” or above in both (Will be taken in place of American History) courses or teacher recommendation — 2 Credits, 2 semesters

This class is designed to explore American history and American literature from early colonization through the 20th century. The total American experience is more completely appreciated through a study of social, political, cultural, and economic events. This course is structured to follow the American history timeline with American literature and composition links to help students understand multiple aspects of the American culture. Students are challenged to study history through primary and secondary sources. The total American experience is studied not only in and of itself, but also in conjunction with other world powers and situations. Any student taking this course must take BOTH American Heritage SS and American Heritage LA simultaneously. The course work cannot be divided.

American Government (SS 1201) – Required
Grade 12 — Prerequisite: Have taken, or currently enrolled in American History — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

This course is designed to explore American government as it evolved through American history. During the semester, the class will study the roots of the American governmental system. The Constitution, as a document will be studied as well as its applications to the Congress, Executive, and Judiciary. In addition, this class will investigate the roles of state and local governments, as well as voting rights, voting behavior, and civil rights. Since current affairs play a crucial role in the understanding of the actual workings of the governmental system, it will be necessary for students to keep abreast of current events through the media. Special attention will be given to helping students develop skills in critical analysis, enabling them to more accurately understand the workings of the government.

Economics (SS 1202) – Required
Grade 12 — Prerequisite: Have taken, or currently enrolled in American History — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

This course will be divided into two major sections. The first, lasting for nine weeks, will deal with economic theory. The purpose of this unit is to familiarize the students with the terms and modern economic problems that they must read and hear about daily in order that they may be more productive and informed participants. Examples of such problems are inflation, recession, and unemployment. The second unit, lasting for nine weeks, will deal with consumer economics. The purpose of this unit is to aid the students in getting the most out of their money or, in other words, in being better shoppers.

Areas to be examined in this unit include:

  1. Housing
  2. Money and Banking
  3. Transportation
  4. Money Management
  5. Insurance
  6. Savings and Investment
  7. Buying Goods and Services
  8. Consumer Protection
  9. Consumer Credit
  10. Economic Theory
  11. Supply and Demand
  12. Comparative Economic Systems
  13. Economic Fluctuations
  14. Business Organization
  15. Competitive Markets
  16. Free Protection

 

During this unit student group work and community resources will be used.

Principles of Sociology (SS 1105) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

This course is designed to deal with sociological ideas although some application of psychological and anthropological methodology will also be introduced. In this class, students are given the opportunity to carry out research on collective behavior through a random sample survey. Units studied include: culture, socialization, marriage and family, ethnic and racial groups, crime and deviant behavior, death and dying, and cults.

Cultural World Geography (SS 0901) – Elective
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit 1 Semester

This one semester course is designed to help students develop an appreciation for not only American geographic regions, but also cultural aspects of other nations throughout the world. In this class, students will be given the opportunity to polish skills in map reading. It is also hoped that the students will learn to understand the importance of geography in an increasingly interdependent world.

World History: 1945-Present (SS 1205) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

This is an elective one semester course for juniors and seniors in social studies. This course will continue the study of world history from 1945 to present. The focus will be on using primary and secondary sources to get a big picture of the events that shape the world we live in today. Students will analyze these sources and come to conclusions on the importance of these events and their influence on the future.

Current Events (SS 1204) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: None — 1 Credit, 1 Semester

This is an elective one semester course for juniors and seniors in social studies. This course will incorporate critical thinking and the use of technology in the study of current events. Students will study different forms of media and learn about bias which will help them think critically about information being shared on events happening in the world today. Students will also participate in discussions, debates, and write about topics that are currently important in the world.

Study Room – Elective
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Formal evaluation and staffing — 1 or 2 Credits, 1 or 2 Semesters

This program is designed to aid students with learning and/or behavior difficulties. The prospective student must be referred by either a high school teacher or counselor and be approved by the Area Education Agency. The primary objectives of the multi-categorical resource room are:

  1. To improve the student’s basic skills consisting of arithmetic, reading vocabulary, reading comprehension, and spelling.
  2. To assist the student in developing functional literacy skills including such topics as:
    • money and banking
    • civic responsibilities
    • insurance
    • housing
    • employment
    • following directions
    • consumer buying
  3. To enhance the student’s ability to learn by presenting regular course work through different teaching methods – small group discussion, taped chapters from textbooks, reading tests to the student, etc.
  4. To improve the student’s organizational and study skills. This includes assignment sheets highlighting notes taken in regular academic classes, preparing for tests and daily emphasis on the individual student taking responsibility for his/her learning and its outcome.

Each student has individual goals designed for him/her that chart learning throughout each semester. The student signs up for either a 45-minute block of time each day or a 90-minute block of time each day, and may remain in the program as long as he/she qualifies. Each year the student’s eligibility for the program is reviewed by the school and the Area Education Agency.

Work Experience – Elective
Grades 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Qualify for Special Needs Program — 1 or 2 Credits, 1 or 2 Semesters

Work Experience is a course offered to students staffed into any special needs program. The purpose of the course is to give students an opportunity to experience different career areas per semester in the surrounding community. Support personnel from the local AEA coordinate the work sites with the student’s interests and abilities. Grading is based on evaluations completed by the supervising person on the job site.

Fusion Reading – Elective
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Qualify for Special Needs Program — 1 or 2 Credits, 1 or 2 Semesters

Fusion Reading is a course offered to students who have been staffed into special education for major reading deficiencies of more than two grade levels behind their peers for reading comprehension. The curriculum is focused on strategies proven to improve reading fluency and comprehension. The strategies taught are prediction, summarization, decoding, word recognition and the integration of the strategies.

Skills Lab (Math, Reading or Writing)Elective
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Qualify for Special Needs Program — .5 or 1 Credit, 1 or 2 Semesters

Skills labs are small group courses designed for students with special needs as a time to develop needed skills in the student’s goal area. Strategies in the goal area are utilized to help students better understand learning that occurs in the classroom.

Decision Making and SkillsElective
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Qualify for Special Needs Program — 1 or 2 Credits, 1 or 2 Semesters

Decision Making and Skills class is designed to build executive skills to enable students to regulate the world around them using organizational and higher-order thinking skills. Organizational skills or foundational skills, include organizing materials, managing time, and initiating and completing tasks. Higher order thinking skills include goal setting, decision making, and self- monitoring to help students prepare for life as both a high school student and in life after high school.

Peer Partner Physical Education (PE 0904) – Required
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Qualify for Special Needs Program — 1 Credit, 2 Semesters

Peer Partner – Workplace Experience (WE 0904) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Instructor approval — 1 Credit, 2 Semesters

Students will cooperatively participate in a variety of activities along with students who have special needs. Individuals will be expected to lead or teach different aspects of class and also assist students with special abilities to facilitate the inclusion of all students in the planned activities. A wide variety of units will be taught with an emphasis on lifetime activities while exploring recreational and leisure opportunities. An added component of the class will be to learn more about various disabilities.

Expanded Creativity, Experience, and Learning (ExCEL) (EXL 0901/0902) – Elective
Prerequisite: Restricted admission (contact your counselor) — Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 — 2 Credits, 2 Semesters

The ExCEL Program in the Clear Lake Community Schools is designed to identify and to serve the needs of students who possess high general intellectual ability and/or creative thinking ability. The principal goal is to provide able students with the learning skills to make the most of their considerable academic talents, as well as, the opportunity to use these talents in a non-traditional, independent program.

Peer Partner – Workplace Exp (WE 0904) – Elective
Grades 11, 12 — Prerequisite: Instructor approval — 1 Credit, 2 Semesters

Students will cooperatively participate in a variety of activities along with students who have special needs. Individuals will be expected to lead or teach different aspects of class and also assist students with special abilities to facilitate the inclusion of all students in the planned activities. A wide variety of units will be taught with an emphasis on lifetime activities while exploring recreational and leisure opportunities. An added component of the class will be to learn more about various disabilities.